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Rutherford Plasma Physics Communication Prize

This prize is for excellence in the communication of plasma physics to non-experts. It recognises outreach work with the general public.


The prize is £500. 

Nominations and self-nominations are welcome.

The winner is announced at our annual conference.

Applications must show:

  • discussion on the impact of the activity
  • evidence of excellent communication skills

Anything that communicates plasma science can be considered – the more creative the better.

Applications should be based on a single activity rather than a range of activities. Previous applications have included:

  • a website
  • a talk or lecture
  • writing an essay or an article for a magazine
  • blogging or producing a podcast or video

The prize is open to all members of the plasma physics community. Applications are judged by distinguished scientists and communicators, these include:

  • one plasma physicist
  • one non-plasma physicist
  • one non-physicist

This prize is sponsored by the Science and Technology Facilities Council Central Laser Facility.

The nominations process is currently closed. Nominations will open again towards the end of 2021.

Winners

2021

Cara Hawkins and Dr Laura Corner

University of Liverpool. For an episode of The Liverpool Scientific (S1, E7: Accelerator Science with Laura Corner). The podcasts can be found on Spotify.

2020

This was not awarded this year due to no entries being received.

2019

The A Glass of Seawater team

University of York. For its series of podcasts on plasma physics and nuclear fusion.

2018

Dr Jena Meinecke

University of Oxford. For her role as lead organiser for the 2017 Royal Society Summer Exhibition stand, How to Make a Supernova featuring plasma research conducted on large laser facilities (focused on AWE's Orion laser) to recreate astrophysical environments in the lab.

2017

Dr Melanie Windridge

Business Development Manager for Tokamak Energy. For her popular science book, Aurora: In Search of the Northern Lights, published by William Collins in 2016.

2016

Kate Lancaster

University of York. For her Friday evening Discourse lecture at the Royal Institution.

2013

Rachel McAdams, Ben Moody, Lee Morgan, Mohammed Shahzad and Tom Williams

University of York. For their short film aimed at children aged 9-11, which explains why scientists are trying to build a 'mini-sun' on earth.