Teaching Medical Physics

Note: These are the new 'Teaching Medical Physics' pages. The older content is still available via the archived website.

A healthy brain. Coloured magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of a healthy brain superimposed on a coloured x-ray of a skull. The cerebellar tonsil is highlighted (orange). The cerebellum is responsible for balance and posture
SOVEREIGN, ISM/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

The Teaching Medical Physics resources are designed for teaching 14-16 science using examples from medical physics.

The resources consist of seven sets of presentations, worksheets and teacher notes that complement the Institute of Physics 2011 schools lecture “From X-rays to Antimatter: The Science of Seeing Inside your Body”.

Pulse oximeters

Pulse oximeters use red and infrared light to monitor pulse rate and the oxygenation of a patient’s blood

Pulse oximeters 

X-ray imaging

X-ray imaging utilises the ability of high frequency electromagnetic waves to pass through the body

X-ray imaging 

Gamma cameras

Gamma cameras test the function of organs using gamma-rays emitted by radioactive material

Gamma cameras 

MRI

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce an image

MRI 

Ultrasound

Ultrasound imaging systems uses piezoelectric transducers as source and detector

Ultrasound 

Electrocardiograms

Electrocardiograms record the activity of the heart through electrodes placed on the patient’s skin

Electrocardiograms 

PET

PET is a gamma imaging technique that uses radiotracers that emit positrons

PET 

Archived material

Visit the old website for archived material

Archived material 



Project supported by the IOP


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