Safety notes

Sound: From musical boxes to iPods

Possible hazards to be discussed with the teacher BEFORE the visit:

Loud sounds can damage ears. The children’s ears are much more sensitive to high pitched sounds than an adult’s ears. Therefore if any high pitched sounds are produced, they must not have a large amplitude.

(Activity 4) The Airzooker can send a blast of air which surprises a child near to the speaker. Use it first to send a blast of air to those furtherest away from you.

(Activity 5) During the dance, children should be warned to take small steps so they do not tread on each other’s feet. Good behaviour is essential. Any child who is uncooperative should be sent from the line.

(Activity 7) Singing rod: this can produce a loud sound. If the children appear uncomfortable then do not excite the rod further. Rosin, particularly when powdered, is a sensitizer which can give rise to allergic dermatitis. It is safest to put the rosin in a cloth and then rub the rod with the part of the cloth carrying the rosin. The children should NOT touch the rod which has been rubbed but the end should be safe enough.

(Activity 11) Sound tubes: once joined these are long and should not be whirled around near the children.

(Activity 14) Tunes from a coat hanger: warn children of the danger of putting objects in the ear.

(Activites 19 and 21) Straw oboes and plastic bottles: for hygiene reasons the straws and bottles should not be passed from child to child.

(Activity 22) Manometer experiment: if the apparatus leaks slightly, it should not be demonstrated near electrical equipment.

(Activity 25) Elastic box: this should be demonstrated. Fishing pole elastic is strong but care needs to be taken when it is stretched. If over-stretched, it may break and flick back painfully. If this is considered a significant risk, eye protection should be worn by the demonstrator and the children should not be too close. Similarly, care should be taken if the tension of strings on stringed instruments is changed.