REMS at Lords

4 May 2011

A bright Spring morning on 7 April 2011 saw 28 REMS members and guests assemble at Lords cricket ground.

REMS at Lords cricket ground

The Lords tavern opened specially early for coffee before we entered the famous ground at 11am. We were met by our guide who had conducted us round Twickenham last year.

First stop was the museum to see the urn containing the “Ashes of English Cricket”. The urn is surprisingly small and our guide explained how it had come about, and the doubts as to what the urn might actually contain, there being no plans to open this sacred object for DNA analysis!

From there we entered the changing rooms for the home team and visitors. Compared to the modern examples at Twickenham and Wembley these had a delightful charm and were reminiscent of a school gymnasium or traditional golf club. Modern showers and medical facilities were, of course, adjacent. 

The ground staff member who looks after the changing rooms was available and told us how the players have lockers, and that there is a strict hierarchy regarding the seating arrangements. 

From here we entered the famous Long Room and saw how the players have to pass through the members when going to the wicket – and when returning!

Finally we went out onto the balcony and marvelled at the modern stands. Though matching up to a degree these are all individual and built at different times. 

The new floodlights for evening games were in evidence, but to satisfy the neighbours, they can be retracted to the height of the stands when not required. 

Opposite the pavilion the Media Centre resembles a giant white chocolate Easter egg propped up on pillars. Due to maintenance work we were not able to visit this section.

The party then had to walk quickly to Little Venice to catch the London Waterbus to Camden Lock. Most members went to the recommended Wetherspoons Ice Wharf pub for a late lunch, rounding off the day with the Camden Lock craft shops or a stroll through Camden Market before catching the waterbus back to Little Venice.