Support young people to change the world

Limit Less is our new campaign to support young people to change the world and fulfil their potential by doing physics

Join the campaign now


Young people are well aware of the unprecedented challenges that we face today and the impact these challenges will have on their future.

We should support their drive to change the world and improve their future, not limit or deny it. 

Physics teaches young people to understand and solve complex problems. Not just on paper. Not just in theory. The kind of problems that exist everywhere in the world, waiting to be solved. There are no limits to what can be achieved with physics.

Unfortunately, some young people are put off by the misconceived ideas they are told about what physics is. Others are denied the opportunity to study physics due to the prejudice and stereotypes that they experience because of who they are. Many girls are told that physics is more suited to boys, and both girls and boys are told that physics is not for the likes of them based on their ethnicity, their sexual orientation, their disability and their social background.  

As a result, too many young people are made to feel that they can’t do physics, or they just don’t fit in.

This is a problem because when young people are deterred from studying physics, they are missing out on the many benefits that studying physics brings. 

Crucially, they are also being denied the opportunity to explore how their world works and contribute to shaping their future as informed citizens.

How we can make change happen

To support young people to change the world, we need to limit less and support them more.

No young person should be made to feel locked out of physics. Help us ensure that there are no limits on who can take part.

Join the campaign now
Support young people to change the world. October 2020.

Download the report

The IOP commissioned Censuswide to conduct two surveys and a series of focus groups to inform our campaign. We also asked our members and subscribers to our Qubit newsletter to provide their own stories of lived experience related to the stereotypes and barriers that our campaign aims to dismantle.

Download and read the report (PDF, 2.83MB)

Student stories

We asked our Qubit readers – 16-24-year-olds currently studying physics at school or university – to share, anonymously, any experiences of being discouraged from pursuing physics.

Read more

Member stories

We asked IOP members to share any experiences of being discouraged to pursue physics.

Read more

Ramneek's story

Ramneek, who finished sixth form this summer, explains how her visual impairment made school a constant struggle and how she’s had to fight for her rights every step of the way.  

Read more

Jamie's story

Jamie left school at 16 to take on a physics apprenticeship. He discusses why he thinks teachers and parents need to take apprenticeships more seriously – and why classrooms aren't the best learning environment for every student.

Read more

Siena's story

At school Siena was told she wasn’t good enough to study physics. Her autism, ADHD, dyspraxia and dyslexia were dismissed. She reveals some of the prejudice and discouragement she has faced in pursuit of the subject she loves.

Read more
Limit Less: Daisy's story

Daisy's story

Experimental physicist Daisy created the Neurodivergent in STEM project. She explains what it's like to be an autistic woman physics, and what the education sector and physics community can do to be more inclusive.

Read more

The spaces where we'll work

This campaign is not directly aimed at young people themselves. Instead, it is aimed at those whom younger people trust and listen to, and who help shape their opinions and decisions.

We will do this by campaigning in the “spaces” where young people are exposed to these different influences – in their homes and communities, their schools, and in the media and social media.

Limit Less in families and communities

If the young people in our lives want to change the world, who are we to tell them no?

Find out more

Limit Less in nurseries and schools

If a student is excited about physics, or they’re interested in the way the world works, then physics is right for them.

Find out more

Limit Less in the media

When simplistic stereotypes are the only physicists we see in our media, it hurts young people. Together, we have the power to change that.

Find out more

Limit Less in social media

Help tomorrow’s physics students find the genuine information they need through social media.

Find out more

Watch our Limit Less film

Watch the audio described version of our film