Franklin medal recipients

Professor Raymond E. Goldstein
University of Cambridge and Churchill College Cambridge
For revealing the physical basis for fluid motion in and around active cells and its importance for the evolution of multicellularity, cell differentiation, and the synchronicity of eukaryotic flagella.

Professor Benjamin Simons
University of Cambridge
For the application of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics to provide fundamental new insights into the mechanisms that regulate stem cell behaviour in tissue maintenance and disease.

Professor Howard R Morris
Imperial College London
For his contributions to mass spectrometer design which revolutionised peptide sequencing and fuelled the proteomics revolution.

Professor Thomas Duke
University College London
For the application of physical principles to the development of elegant molecular sorting devices, for providing new insights into the organising principles of cells and for his primary contributions to a new generation of theories of how the inner ear works.

Professor David Delpy
University College London
For his pioneering development of a range of novel techniques and instruments to monitor the health of patients in intensive-care units and to image tissue physiology and metabolism.