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James Joule Medal and Prize recipients

For distinguished contributions to applied physics, involving the application of the methods and principles of fundamental physics to solve technological problems.


2020

Professor Richard Bowtell
University of Nottingham

For his outstanding application of physics to the innovative development of new hardware and techniques for biomedical imaging, and their application in medicine and neuroscience.

Find out more about Professor Richard Bowtell.

2019

Professor Robert Hadfield
University of Glasgow
For the advancement of infrared single photon detection technology, through innovations in superconducting devices and cryogenic engineering.

2018

Professor Ravi Silva
University of Surrey
For his distinguished contributions to the development of carbon nanomaterials for use in cross-disciplinary advanced technology applications relevant to materials, optoelectronics and sustainable energy.

2017

Professor Henry Snaith
University of Oxford
For his pioneering discovery and development of highly efficient thin-film organic-inorganic metal-halide perovskite solar cells.

2015

Professor Judith Driscoll
University of Cambridge
For her pioneering contributions to the understanding and enhancement of critical physical properties of strongly-correlated oxides, encompassing oxide superconductors, ferroelectrics, multiferroics and semiconductors

2013

Professor Paul French
Imperial College London
For his contributions to the development of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) and its wide deployment from underpinning laboratory research to clinical application

2011

Dr Donald D Arnone
TeraView Ltd
For his pioneering work in the science, technology and applications of terahertz radiation.

2009

Professor Jenny Nelson
Imperial College London
For her penetrating theoretical analyses of a range of photovoltaic materials and devices which have had a profound influence on solar cell design.

2008

Professor David Parker
University of Birmingham
For the creation of positron emission particle tracking as a practical tool in a wide variety of engineering applications.