The Holweck medal and prize

This award was instituted in 1945, jointly by the French and British Physical Societies as a memorial to Fernand Holweck, Director of the Curie Laboratory of the Radium Institute in Paris, who was tortured and killed by the Gestapo during the occupation of France 1940-44.

The Holweck medal

The money for the prize was, initially, subscribed by Fellows of The Physical Society and others. A medal, originally in bronze, but since 1972 in gold, is given by the Société Française de Physique. The award is made in alternate years by the Councils of one of the two societies to a physicist selected from a list of nominees submitted by the other.

Terms
The award will be made for distinguished work in any aspect of physics that is ongoing or has been carried out within the 10 years preceding the award. In selecting the recipient of the award, the primarily experimental interest of Holweck will be borne in mind. Until 1974 it was given in even-dated years to a physicist based in France and presented in the UK or Ireland, and in odd-dated years to a physicist based in the UK or Ireland and presented in France. In 1974 on the occasion of the joint celebration of the centenaries of the two physical societies, two awards were made. The award is now made in odd-dated years to a physicist based in France and presented in the UK or Ireland and in even-dated years to a physicist based in the UK or Ireland and presented in France. The medal is gold and is accompanied by a prize of 3000€.