Three IOP members are among 50 new fellows of the Royal Society

11 May 2017

Two IOP fellows and an IOP member have been elected fellows of the Royal Society (RS) – a distinction given for outstanding contributions to science.

IOP member Professor Tony Bell and IOP fellows Professor Robert Ritchie and Professor Jennifer Thomas were among the 50 new fellows announced on 5 May.

Three IOP members are among 50 new fellows of the Royal Society

Bell is Professor of Physics at the University of Oxford and the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, whose work encompasses laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. He has “shown how strong magnetic field is generated during particle acceleration and how it enables cosmic ray acceleration to high energy; initiated the theory of non-local transport for heat flow in inertial confinement fusion; explained the collimation of laser-produced energetic electrons by resistively generated magnetic field; and, with John Kirk, demonstrated the possibility of electron-positron pair production in ultra-high intensity laser-plasma interactions,” his citation from the RS says. He was awarded the IOP’s Hoyle Medal and Prize in 2014.

 

Three IOP members are among 50 new fellows of the Royal Society

Ritchie is the H.T. and Jessie Chua Distinguished Professor of Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, and senior faculty scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, but undertook his first degree, MA and PhD at the University of Cambridge in the UK. He is known for his work on the mechanics and micro-mechanisms of fracture and fatigue of structural and biological materials, his citation from the RS says, and he has “provided a microstructural basis for their damage-tolerance and fatigue resistance”. His current research focuses on high-entropy and bulk-metallic glass metallic alloys, the structural integrity of human bone, and the development of novel structural materials inspired by nature. He has been awarded numerous prizes and fellowships.

 

Three IOP members are among 50 new fellows of the Royal Society

Thomas is Professor of Physics at University College London, where she is part of the High Energy Physics Group, and has led the international MINOS collaboration at Fermilab in the US since 2010, extending its scope to search for sterile neutrinos. She is known for her pioneering work in high-energy particle physics and especially for major contributions to the study of neutrinos, being a leader in the development and analysis of neutrino oscillation measurements. She has also played a leading role in detector development. She was awarded a CBE in 2011 for services to science and in 2012 she was made a fellow of the American Physical Society.