Peter Higgs is awarded the Royal Society’s most prestigious prize

21 July 2015

Prof. Peter Higgs, an honorary fellow of the IOP, is to receive the Copley Medal – the Royal Society’s (RS’s) most prestigious award, while IOP honorary fellows Prof. Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell and Prof. Sir Christopher Llewellyn Smith are to receive Royal Medals.

Peter Higgs
Peter Higgs

  
The Copley Medal is the world’s oldest scientific prize, having first been conferred in 1731. It is given for outstanding achievements in scientific research and has been awarded to Prof. Higgs for “his fundamental contribution to particle physics with his theory explaining the origin of mass in elementary particles, confirmed by the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)”.

Prof. Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell and Prof. Sir Christopher Llewellyn Smith
Prof. Bell Burnell and Prof. Llewellyn Smith

Royal Medals are premier awards of the RS and are given for important discoveries in the physical, biological and applied sciences. Prof. Bell Burnell has been awarded a Royal Medal for “her pivotal contribution in observing, analysing and understanding pulsars, one of the most important astronomical discoveries of the 20th century”. Prof. Sir Christopher Llewellyn Smith has been awarded a Royal Medal for “his major contributions to the development of the Standard Model, particularly his success in making the case for the building of the LHC”.

The RS’s Hughes Medal has been awarded to IOP fellow Prof. George Efstanthiou for “many outstanding contributions to our understanding of the early universe, in particular his pioneering computer simulations, observations of galaxy clustering and studies of the fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background”.

The RS’s Clifford Paterson Medal and Lecture has been awarded to IOP fellow Prof. Russell Cowburn for “his remarkable academic, technical and commercial achievements in nano-magnetics”.

The medallists will be celebrated at the RS’s Anniversary Day in November 2015.