It’s been a while since my degree

If you have a degree in physics or engineering or another physics-rich subject but you have been busy elsewhere since you graduated, this is not necessarily a disadvantage when you apply for Initial Teacher Education.

The main thing is you have decided to teach physics.

When you apply, the training provider will consider your knowledge and skills and decide what extra subject support you need. In some cases, especially if your work has been using physics, this extra support may be minimal.

If the admissions tutors decide you would make an excellent teacher but feel you have insufficient subject knowledge to go directly to an ITE course, they may recommend you take a Subject Knowledge Enhancement course to restore rusty physics to a sparkle.

So, if you want to become a physics teacher but are worried that your subject knowledge is not up to date, look for ITE providers who mention SKE courses. You can also indicate on your application that you are interested in SKEs or speak directly to SKE providers.

The training provider will try to help smooth your transition into teaching. For example, there may be issues to do with getting used to a change in salary, starting again from the bottom or adapting to a new environment after many years outside education.

Being able to show an interest in teaching physics is key, as this tutor noted, “I have seen many applicants well over 50 become excellent teachers of physics – and why not? Such applicants should make the most of these experiences in their applications. They often have a great deal to offer.”