Nuclear Industry Group

This is an IOP special interest group, which is a community of IOP members focused on a particular discipline, application or area of interest. Special interest groups allow members to connect and share knowledge and ideas. The IOP funds groups to deliver a range of activities including events, prizes and bursaries. All of our groups are driven by members.

About the group

As a special interest, member-driven group, we are interested in all aspects of the nuclear industry. Our role is to:

  • recognise the interests of a broad audience
  • encourage links between physicists in the nuclear industry
  • welcome members from a wide range of professional backgrounds 
  • appreciate diverse roles of physicists in civil and defence nuclear industries

You might be:

  • employed in the industry 
  • a student considering a career in this sector 
  • someone with a general interest in this field

What the group does

We represent physicists involved with or interested in all aspects of the nuclear industry. 

We look forward to welcoming you as a member and meeting you at an event.

Download our group flyer.

Watch our group’s subtitled YouTube discussion on the UK’s nuclear future.

Would you like to join this group?

Group physics prizes and competitions

Nuclear Industry Group Prizes

We award two prizes each year to:

  • encourage innovation in the industry
  • promote the role of physicists in the industry
  • reward effort and commitment to advancing the industry

The Early Career Prize 

This prize is for physicists in the early stages of a career in the nuclear industry.

It is awarded to the nominee who, while addressing a project or problem in their work, has:

  • participated in outreach
  • shown innovative thinking
  • attained recognition in their area of work
  • a positive impact resulting from their area of their work
  • a wide breadth of activity

The solution must have required the application of skills and understanding expected of a professional physicist working in an industrial environment.

Nominations

Nominees for the early career prize must:

  • be a member or associate member of the Institute of Physics
  • have worked in the nuclear industry for no more than 10 years (allowance is made for career breaks)

Nominations can be made by anyone, including the nominee.

Submit nominations to groups@iop.org.

What to include in the submission

  • Description of the challenge and how it was addressed by the nominee. If this is sensitive information, please notify the group chair before submission. We can put measures in place to allow your submission to be considered. This description is no more than 500 words. It can include diagrams or photographs.
  • Statement from the nominee’s line manager and/or a client describing the individual’s innovative approach to problems, and their demonstration of enthusiasm and determination in their work. This is no more than 500 words.
  • Brief CV outlining the nominee’s experience in the industry and their background. This is no more than two sides of A4.
  • Nominations are considered by a panel of group committee members and co-opted specialist panel members as required. Their decision is final.

Winners

2019

Jacob Home

For important first steps in his career by engaging with outreach, by innovating in a broad scope of work, and thereby having an impact on the world around him.

2016 

Rebecca Houghton

For her excellent work for the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority on the future strategic direction for management of radioactive material stockpiles in the UK, proposed to the Department for Energy and Climate Change.

2015 

David Hughes

For his leadership of a team to develop a suitable decay heat methodology with associated validation and uncertainties associated with the proposed Sizewell B Dry Fuel Store.

2014 

Chris Holland

For his work on the Lower Ports Nuclear Analysis project for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor fusion reactor.

2013

Rhodri Morgan

For his leadership of the development of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy as a tool for the monitoring of nuclear waste packets.

2012

Craig Shearer

For his work to develop a practical system using cosmic-ray muons to analyse the contents of Intermediate Level Waste containers.

2011

Lindsay Cox

For her innovative approach and leadership in establishing and promoting the practical application of Muon Scattering Tomography detection techniques capability.

The Career Contribution Prize 

The prize is to:

  • promote innovation in the nuclear industry
  • promote the role of physicists in the nuclear industry
  • reward effort and commitment to advancing the nuclear industry

The prize is presented annually to a physicist who has:

  • worked for a substantial part of their career in the nuclear industry (usually more than 20 years)
  • shown outstanding levels of innovation and contributed to the progress of the industry over a sustained period
  • demonstrated outstanding commitment to the promotion of the nuclear industry throughout their career
  • applied their skills and understanding in a way that is expected of a professional physicist working in an industrial environment

Nominations

Submit nominations to the group chair Heather.Beaumont@physics.org 

Nominations are considered by a panel of members of the IOP Nuclear Industry Group and any co-opted specialist panel members as required. Their decision is final.

Nominations for the 2020 award for both prizes will open in the fourth quarter of 2019 with a deadline in the first quarter of 2020.  

What to include in the submission

  • Description of the challenge and how it was addressed by the nominee. If this is sensitive information, please notify the Group Chair before submission. We can put measures in place to allow your submission to be considered. This description is no more than 500 words. It can include diagrams or photographs.
  • Statement from the nominee’s line manager and/or a client describing the individual’s innovative approach to problems, and their demonstration of enthusiasm and determination in their work. This is no more than 500 words.
  • Brief CV outlining the nominee’s experience in the industry and their background. This is no more than two sides of A4.
  • Nominations are considered by a panel of group committee members and co-opted specialist panel members as required. Their decision is final.

Winners

2019

Professor Jon Billowes

For a long and far-reaching career with an international reputation for research and excellence. He has worked at the highest levels delivering innovative ways to ensure the UK’s nuclear education.

2018

Dr Colin H Zimmerman

For over 40 years of outstanding contributions and dedication to research in the nuclear industry. His career in the Nuclear Industry spanned over 35 years and over the course of his career he was involved in many varied technical areas and supported a wide range of UK and European initiatives and activities.

2017

Steve Curr

For over 40 years of work in the nuclear industry, starting as an apprentice at Rolls-Royce and developing his career through numerous leadership roles. He played a key role in the core design for the Dreadnought Class boats and in the delivery of significant training to engineers in the nuclear industry. 

2016

Kevin Hesketh

For over 40 years of excellence in technical research in the nuclear industry. He contributed to international initiatives and agencies and used his extensive knowledge for the benefit of others in the industry.

2015

David Weaver

For dedicating over 40 years to research and training used by the nuclear industry, and for making significant contributions to both.

2012

Alan Copestake

For his contribution to the development of computational methods that have enabled the design of a generation of light-water nuclear reactors for submarines.

Physics resources

 

Nuclear Industry and Medical Physics Groups joint event 7 June 2019

The event was held at the IOP HQ in King’s Cross and aimed at synchronising the discussion and discourse of two different sectors when discussing radionuclides – a topic becoming more interesting to medical physics as the world begins to better manage and even look past the ubiquitous Tc-99m. Several experts gave presentations across two sessions and a lively panel discussion of all the speakers drew each to a close. Here are some of the presentations given on the day:

Nuclear education and skills capability: the role of international collaboration, 14 March 2018

Watch the YouTube video on Nuclear Emergency Support Team activities and what it means for the industry, by Jim Gulliford.

From Magnox to Chernobyl: A report on clearing-up problematic nuclear wastes, 28 September 2017

Download the presentation on problematic nuclear wastes and plans on remediating them, including disposal in a geological disposal facility (PDF, 14MB).

60 Years on from ZETA, 14 June 2017

Download the presentation 60 Years on from ZETA by Chris Warrick (PDF, 5.4MB).
Download the presentation on Inertial Confinement Fusion by Kate Lancaster (PDF, 2.7MB).
Download the presentation on Compact Tokamaks with High Temperature Superconducting Magnets by David Kingham (PDF, 2.5 MB).

Regulation of UK Nuclear New Build, 17 May 2017

Download the presentation on how the Office for Nuclear Regulation monitor the UK Nuclear New Build project to deliver nuclear reactors by Mike Finnerty (PDF, 835KB).

The UK's Nuclear Future, 28 February 2017

Download the presentation on why the future looks brighter for the nuclear industry than it has for some years, by Dame Sue Ion (PDF, 7.88 MB).

Nuclear Security, 15 November 2016

Download presentations on Cyber and Information Security by Robert Rodger and Cyber and Information Security, by Graham Urwin (PDF, 3MB).

Generation IV Reactors: Opportunities and Challenges, 2 November 2016

Download the presentation on the promise of reliable, low-carbon, and economic nuclear energy with the potential to be sustainable, by Richard Stainsby (PDF, 4.5MB).

Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste, 13 July 2016

Download the presentation on radioactive waste disposal with some of the industry's experts (PDF, 6MB).

Small Modular Reactors – the Real Nuclear Renaissance? 25 May 2016

Download the presentation by Juan Matthews that asks can factory prefabrication and larger series of orders make small reactors economic? (PDF, 5MB).

Nuclear data, 12 April 2016

Download the presentation on the physics behind the production of nuclear data sets and extending data beyond neutron interactions, by Dr Robert Mills (PDF, 930KB).

Farewell to Magnox, 28 October 2015   

Watch presentations from a half day seminar at the Wylfa Nuclear Power Station that marked the end of the use of Magnox reactors to produce electricity. 

Magnox Reactor Fleet In Pictures (PPT, 3.20MB)
Welcome to Wylfa (PPT, 3.52MB)
Magnox – the historical background (PPT, 5MB)
Evolution of the Magnox Design (PPT, 6MB)
History of the Wylfa Boilers (PDF, 3.52MB)
Radioactive Waste Management (PPT, 5.34MB)
The Future – Wylfa Newydd (PPT, 3.9MB)
Hitachi-GE and the UK ABWR (PPT, 3.5MB)

Travels with a Cyclotron, 9 June 2015

Download the presentation on the history and application of the UK’s cyclotrons used to produce images of lungs with a gamma camera, by David Parker (PDF, 5.4MB). 

Graphite Reactors, 24 March 2015

Download the presentation on Radiation Damage in Nuclear Graphite, by Helen Freeman (PDF, 2.78MB).

From Fission to Fuel Gone, 20 November 2014

Download the presentation on the first significant stage in the decommissioning of the reactor, by Trevor Chambers (PDF, 6.68 MB).

Innovative approaches to optimise the management of higher activity radioactive wastes, 17 September 2014

Download the presentation on a range of innovative approaches to optimise the management of higher activity radioactive and an update on the work of Radioactive Waste Management Limited, by Ciara Walsh (PDF, 2.91MB)

Jules Horowitz Reactor, 6 March 2014

Download the presentation on the UK’s contribution to the Joules Horowitz reactor, by David Farrant (PDF, 5.2MB).

Group events 

Find group events on the IOP events portal.

Newsletter

November 2018 (PDF, 1.52MB).
September 2017 (PDF, 2.23MB).
September 2016 (PDF, 1.66MB).
October 2015 (PDF, 1.38MB).
September 2014 (PDF, 695KB).
September 2013 (PDF, 474KB).
December 2012 (PDF, 606KB)
September 2011 (PDF, 911KB)

Committee and contacts



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