Soft condensed matter and physics applied to the life sciences

Rosalind Franklin Medal and Prize

History
In 2008 Council decided to establish the Rosalind Franklin Medal and Prize.

The physicist behind the medal
Rosalind Franklin was an English X-ray crystallographer whose work was critical to the understanding of the molecular structure of graphite, coal, viruses and DNA – the latter being recognised with Francis Crick, James Watson and Maurice Wilkins’s award of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1962, four years after Franklin’s death.

Terms
The award shall be made for distinguished contributions to physics applied to the life sciences including medical and biological physics. The medal will be silver and will be accompanied by a prize of £1,000 and a certificate.

Rosalind Franklin medal recipients

Sam Edwards Medal and Prize

History
In 2016 Council established the Sam Edwards Medal and Prize.

The physicist behind the medal
Born in Wales, Edwards’ work in condensed matter physics started in 1958 with a paper showing that statistical properties of disordered systems (glasses, gels etc) could be described by the Feynman diagram and path-integral methods invented in quantum field theory. During the following 35 years, Edwards worked in the theoretical study of complex materials, such as polymers, gels, colloids and similar systems.

Edwards was a recipient of the IOP’s Maxwell Medal and Prize, the Royal Society’s Davy Medal and Royal Medal, the Dirac Medal of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, and the Boltzmann Medal of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics.

Terms
The award shall be made for distinguished contributions in soft matter physics. The medal will be silver and will be accompanied by a prize of £1,000 and a certificate.

Sam Edwards medal recipients