2017 James Chadwick Medal and Prize

Professor Guy Wilkinson of the University of Oxford for his outstanding contributions to the experimental study of heavy quarks and CP violation, most especially for his leadership of, and his decisive contributions to, the LHCb experiment at CERN.

Professor Guy Wilkinson is a world authority in heavy quark physics and CP violation. He currently leads the LHCb collaboration as its spokesperson, having previously served as its physics coordinator during the crucial first two years of LHC operation.

Wilkinson has made a number of decisive contributions to the directions that LHCb has taken in its physics programme. He was one of the prime movers of the initiative to operate the experiment at double its original design luminosity, showing that the challenges posed by increased multiple-collision pile-up and of designing suitable trigger strategies could be overcome, thereby increasing the physics reach of the experiment.

He also made important contributions to the design, construction, commissioning, operation and calibration of the Ring-Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system, which provides LHCb with hadron identification capabilities that are essential for a wide spectrum of measurements.

Wilkinson is an expert in charm-quark physics, having established charm as a major LHCb analysis area and being instrumental in increasing the trigger bandwidth allocated to charm physics at LHCb. Previously, he established UK participation in the CLEO-c experiment and led measurements of strong phases in D meson decay that are vital for interpreting data from LHCb on the CKM angle gamma.

Wilkinson led the group responsible for the calibration of the collision energy of the LEP-2 electron–positron collider, essential for determining mass of the W boson. He also contributed to the measurement of the W boson’s mass using data from the DELPHI experiment, made important contributions to the measurement of the mass of the Z boson, and, in addition, studied the properties of the Z boson in the di-muon final state.