Katharine Burr Blodgett Medal and Prize

In 2008 Council introduced a medal to recognise contributions to the organisation or application of physics in an industrial or commercial context. Originally this medal was known as the Business and Innovation Medal; from 2012 it was renamed the Swan Medal of the Institute of Physics in recognition of Sir Joseph Swan, and in 2016 it was renamed to the Katherine Burr Blodgett Medal and Prize to recognise her contributions to physics in industry.

Dr Blodgett was an American researcher and the first woman to be awarded a PhD in physics from the University of Cambridge, in 1926. After receiving her master’s degree, she was hired by General Electric, where she invented low-reflectance “invisible” glass, where the non-reflective coating is called a Langmuir-Blodgett film. Blodgett was issued eight US patents during her career and was the sole inventor on all but two of them.

Terms

The award shall be made for outstanding and sustained contributions to the organisation or application of physics in an industrial or commercial context. The medal will be gold and accompanied by a prize of £1,000 and a certificate.

Medallists