Physics education public engagement within physics

Daphne Jackson Medal and Prize

History
In 2016 Council established the Daphne Jackson Medal and Prize.

The physicist behind the medal
Daphne Jackson became Britain’s first female professor of physics in 1971 when she was appointed by Surrey University at the age of 34, and later rose to be the dean. She was president of the Women’s Engineering Society and vice-president of the Institute of Physics, after being its youngest ever Fellow. She introduced the returner’s fellowships for women who were having difficulty getting back into science after a career break. After she died, these were named after her and have been a successful means of retraining and giving confidence to women after sometimes long breaks. Many women have benefitted from her initiative.

Terms
The award shall be made for exceptional early career contributions to physics education and to widening participation within it. The medal will be bronze and will be accompanied by a prize of £1,000 and a certificate.

Mary Somerville Medal and Prize

History
In 2016 Council established the Mary Somerville Medal and Prize. 

The physicist behind the medal
Mary Somerville was a Scottish science writer and polymath. She studied mathematics and astronomy, and was nominated to be jointly the first female member of the Royal Astronomical Society at the same time as Caroline Herschel. Somerville published her first paper, The Magnetic Properties of the Violet Rays of the Solar Spectrum, in the Proceedings of the Royal Society in 1826. Her other work, On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences, is one of the biggest-selling science books of the 19th century and was commonly used as a textbook until the early 20th century. 

Terms
The award shall be made for exceptional early career contributions to public engagement within physics. The medal will be bronze and will be accompanied by a prize of £1,000 and a certificate.

Medallists